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Nino Cais "Untitled"

Three Artists Making Their NYC Debuts

New York is the place where cultures come to an apex. There’s no better illustration of this than the exciting mix of international art on view at NYC galleries in June. Below you’ll find three exciting international artists on view for the first time in New York:

 

Nino Cais “Teach Me How To Dance” @ Fridman Gallery (thru June 11)

Hailing from: Brazil

Horseshoes pierced with riding crops, which precariously balance silk handkerchiefs (pictured above), is an example of collaged sculptures, video, and compositions, which attempt a commentary on the balance between human instinct and societal norms.

 

 

Bernard Ammerer "Interface"
Bernard Ammerer “Interface”

Bernard Ammerer “Interface” @ 532 Gallery (thru June 18)

Hailing from: Austria

Casually dressed figures jump, peer, and run further into nondescript and cloud-filled paintings. Surrealism is a definite influence, with some headless figures and body-less heads floating dwelling in several canvases.

 

 

Kwon Young-woo "Untitled," courtesy the Estate of Kwon Young-woo and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo
Kwon Young-woo “Untitled,” courtesy the Estate of Kwon Young-woo and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo

Kwon Young-Woo @ Blum & Poe (thru July 1)

Hailing from: Korea

Calling to mind the hypnotic repetitiveness of Yayoi Kusama’s Nets, Kwon Young-Woo’s scratched paper compositions beckon you to take closer look at where his marks start and end. Young-Woo’s work is a demonstration of Dansaekhwa, a 1970s and 80s Korean movement concerned with the manipulation of material. A generation older than Lee Ufan, Young-Woo is one of the key founders of the group.